Thursday, October 31, 2013

Psycho: Great Hitchcock Movie Thrillers

Psycho: Great Hitchcock Movie Thrillers
by Bernard Herrman [Compact Disc 782.14 Psy]

How better to get in the mood for Halloween than with music from scary thrillers from Alfred Hitchcock. It includes music from Psycho, Marnie, North by Northwest, Spellbound, and many more (including the Alfred Hitchcock Presents TV theme). -- recommended by Carolyn D. - Polly Music Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try The Maltese falcon and other classic film scores by Adolph Deutsch.]

[ official Bernard Herrman Society web site ]

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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Metropolis: The Restored Authorized Edition

Metropolis: The Restored Authorized Edition
[DVD Metropolis]

This 1927 film is one of the best-known and most influential of all the silent films from that era. Directed by famed German auteur Fritz Lang, and influenced in part by the 1920 science fiction play R.U.R. by Czech playright Karel Capek, Metropolis is a marvelous look at social class differences, the liberating and restrictive influence of technology on society, and the dreams of what the future could look like. The movie is beautifully filmed, with emotional performances from the main actors, and some of the most elaborate set pieces you'll ever see in a silent film. Over the years, several differently edited versions have appeared, and the movie is occasionally show in some theaters with live piano accompaniement. For a long time, the copies being shown were of very poor quality, however a restoration edition was released in 2002, which included the original 1927 orchestral score. That is this Kino Video edition, available from the libraries. This particular set also includes several nice "extra features", including a 43-minute documentary on the making of the original film, and a featurette on the 2002 digital restoration. I highly recommend this film for fans of the silent film era, as well as for science fiction fans who want to see one of the earliest and most influential films of that genre. -- recommended by Scott C. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try F.W. Murnau's silent film Noseratu, no longer in the libraries' collection, but available through InterLibrary Loan.]

[ Internet Movie Database entry for this film ] | [ official 2002 Metropolis Restoration web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Speak of the Devil

Speak of the Devil
by Allison Leotta

When I finished this book all I could say was wow! There are lots of twists and turns in this well-written page-turner. Federal prosecutor, Anna Curtis, takes on the vicious MS-13 gang that is terrorizing lower income residents in Washington D.C. Her desire for justice brings uncomfortable truths about the past to the surface. These facts impact Anna professionally and personally and leave her reeling. This is the third book in the series by former federal prosecutor Allison Leotta. She uses her experiences as the basis for her plots. -- recommended by Donna G. - Virtual Services Department

[ official Speak of the Devil page on the official Allison Leotta web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Into the Wild

Into the Wild
by Jon Krakauer [917.98 Kra]

Chris McCandless, a young twenty-something from a well-off family in D.C., ditches his upper middle class life and hitchhikes into the Alaskan wild; four months later his body is found in an abandon bus used as a shelter in the middle of the Alaskan forest (this isn't a spoiler, it is known from the cover of the book). Krakauer does an amazing job of retracing Chris' final steps and putting together the pieces of his transient life. For as dark as the subject matter is, Krakauer adds his own personal experiences of being a young man with a knack for the outdoors, hiking, and climbing to paint a picture of McCandless as not some naive lunatic who wondered off to his own demise, but as an intelligent young man with a passion for the outdoors who died doing what he loved. Even more intriguing are the hauntingly relevant quotes from people like Thoreau, Twain, John Muir at the beginning of each chapter. Into the Wild is a warning to the over-ambitious, but at the same time a reminder to go out and do what you love – an overall metaphor for life. -- recommended by Jeremiah J. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try Into the Wild (DVD), based on the Krakauer book; Into thin Air – also by Krakauer.]

[Also available in book-on-cd and downloadable E-book formats.]

[ Wikipedia page for Into the Wild ] | [ Wikipedia page for Jon Krakauer ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

The Beach Boys in Concert

The Beach Boys in Concert: The Ultimate History of America's Band on Tour and Onstage
by Jan Rusten and Jon Stebbins [Music 781.66 Bea]

As a longtime fan of the Beach Boys, I was excited to see that someone had finally compiled a comprehensive list of all the Beach Boys' concerts and other shows, spanning a period of fifty years. Besides giving information about the Beach Boys' concerts, the book was also filled with great photos of the group up to the 50th year reunion tour. This book is not just for die-hard fans; anyone interested in the history of the group and the individuals in the band will find this a fascinating read. I was especially interested in reading about the Beach Boys' concerts here in Nebraska. One interesting fact: Carl Wilson had two of his guitars stolen from a rental car at one of their earliest concerts in Omaha!. -- recommended by Kim J. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try Fifty Sides of the Beach Boys by Mark Dillon, Heroes and Villains: the True story of the Beach Boys by Steven Gaines.]

[ official Beach Boys web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Back to the Future - The Complete Trilogy

Back to the Future – The Complete Trilogy
[DVD Back]

Marty McFly is a high school student who is friends with a crazy scientist named Doc Brown, in this 1980's film trilogy. Doc invents a time machine and during testing, Marty accidentally travels back to 1955 when his parents are in high school. He locates the 1955 version of Doc to help him power the time machine to get him back to the future. However while the repairs are underway, he meet his mother who thinks he's dreamy. He then has to get his parents to fall in love so as to not alter history. He does eventually get back to 1985, but in the second film must return to 1955 because of a mishap on a visit to 2015. At the end of the second film, Doc is hit by lighting in the time machine (which delivers the correct amount of power to the flux capacitor) and is send back to 1885. So in the third film, Marty, with the help of 1955 Doc, goes back in time to the wild west to bring his friend back to 1985. I think it's a fun series because it takes place in the same town in four very different times. This movie trilogy has so much variety that it would appeal to viewers who enjoy adventure, time-travel, love stories, or 80's movies. -- recommended by Kristen A. - Gere Branch Library

[ Internet Movie Database entry for the first film in the series ] | [ official Back to the Future Facebook page ]


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Eater-of-Bone

Eater-of-Bone
by Robert Reed

This is a terrific collection of four novellas from Lincoln's own Hugo-award-winning science fiction author. Three of the four stories are reprints, including "A Billion Eves", the story for which Reed won the 2007 Hugo Award for Best Novella. The fourth story is an original one which provides the title for this hardback volume – "Eater-of-Bone". This story is tied in to Reed's long-running "Great Ship" universe of interconnected tales, involving far-future humans who have become nearly immortal, and their experiences as they travel the universe. The story "Eater-of-Bone" is one of the best, and strangest, in that sequence of stories, and I highly recommend it. In addition, all four stories in this collection are among Reed's best work in the past 5 or 6 years. For an author who primarily writes and publishes short fiction (not novels), this is a marvelous introduction to Reed's body of work – you can also sample more of his short stories in the two collections The Dragons of Springplace and The Cuckoo's Boys. -- recommended by Scott C. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try Marrow or The Well of Stars, Reed's two novels set in his Greatship universe.]

[ Nebraska Author Robert Reed booklist here on BookGuide ] | [ official Eater-of-Bone page on the official Robert Reed web site – where you'll find links to many of his stories free online! ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

First Evidence

First Evidence
by Ken Goddard

Colin Cellars first day as a crime scene investigator for the Oregon State Patrol can only be described as eerie. He is called out to a murder scene in cabin tucked away in the woods. When Colin arrives at the scene he meets two very scared troopers who are prepared to shoot him and ask questions later. They tell Cellars that two other officers were sent to the scene first and that they have disappeared. The nervous troopers also say that their radios have quit working. Colin sends them to get help while he collects evidence in the cabin. The officers are reluctant to let Cellars stay alone but Colin assures them that he will be fine. While he is working in the dark cabin lighted by a spotlight Colin is attacked by someone or something. After Colin gets back to the station learns that the officers that he sent for help are missing. Each time Colin goes back to the cabin look for more evidence spookier things happen. Then the evidence that he collected disappears. This book has an X-Files feel to it. This gripping audio book made me feel like I was riding along with Cellars as he fought the shadowy beings. -- recommended by Donna G. - Virtual Services Department
[Also available in traditional print format.]

[ official First Evidence page on the official Ken Goddard web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Monday, October 28, 2013

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
[DVD Terminator]

One of my absolute favorite science fiction TV series of the past 10 years. This 2008-2009 two-season series was set in contemporary times and fit into the continuity of the Terminator feature films. It features Lena Headey taking over the role of Sarah Connor from Linda Hamilton. She and her teenaged son John Connor (played by Thomas Dekker), the future leader of the rebellion when the machines take over (as established in multiple films) are on the run, worried that they are still being pursued by killer robots from the future, as well as conventional law enforcement forces for crimes they've been accused of). This series had a terrific supporting cast, with Summer Glau (from Firefly) as a female-shaped cyborg sent to protect John, Brian Austin Greene as a future freedom fighter sent back in time to assist them, Richard T. Jones as FBI Agent James Ellison, whose encounters with Sarah and John change his world views, and a chilling Garret Dillahunt as Cromartie, the latest generation of terminator sent back to pursue the Connors, which appears to lose its memory. The production values and special effects (particularly gunfire and explosions) were of feature-film quality on a weekly schedule. The performances, particularly Heady, Jones and Dillahunt, were unforgettable. There were flash-forwards to the terminator-controlled future which seemed inevitable, no matter what actions the Connors took in their own "present" to try to avoid it. The series ended after only two seasons, with several storylines still unresolved -- It and Fringe were both airing on the FOX television network, which decided it was only going to renew one of the two shows, and Fringe got the pick-up. I highly recommend this series to any scifi fans, particularly if you love the Terminator movies! -- recommended by Scott C. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try any or all of the Terminator feature films.]

[ Internet Movie Database entry for this series ] | [ official Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles DVD web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Friday, October 25, 2013

Customer Review - Everfound

Everfound
by Neil Shusterman [j Shusterman/YA Shusterman]

As I finished each book in The Skinjacker Trilogy, my husband would ask me, "Are you planning to buy the set?" To that question, I always responded, "I won't know until I read the third book." He suggested it shouldn't matter given that I liked the first two, but far too many trilogies have let me down with their concluding volume. Thankfully, Everfound did not. As often happens with the final book, Everfound is the darkest and most complicated in the set. Nick and Mary are both building armies to destroy one another. Allie has not only discovered the ability to skinjack (hijack a body of a living person), but also what that means and how to use it to help or destroy the living. Having been stripped of his monstrous shape by Mary, Mikey McGill falls in love with her and is quickly rejected, which awakens a new power within him. He can use this power for good or for bad — and it's anyone guess which he will do. There are also new characters introduced, such as a scar wraith who can permanently extinguish the souls in Everlost. And then there are familiar character who take on larger roles, such as Jackin' Jill, who used to be a love interest of Milos, who himself took a fancy to Allie until she rejected him. Oh, and by the way, the reason Nick wants to destroy Mary is because she wants to destroy our living world. Did I mention that Everfound is dark and complicated? Indeed, sometimes it felt a little too much like our own world, whereas I read fantasies to escape into a fanciful and imaginative place. Over all, though, I still feel Shusterman has successfully created a well-written and memorable trilogy. -- review submitted by Allison H.-F. - a customer of the Bennett Martin Public Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Customer Review - Everwild

Everwild
by Neil Shusterman [j Shusterman/YA Shusterman]

The front inside flap of Everwild reveals that the limbo world is now at war, accounts of which are certainly engrossing. But there are other aspects of the second book in Shusteman's series that captivated my heart. For example, because in Everlost "all things that have earned immortality remain forever in glory", Shusterman puts himself in the enviable position of being able to offer recognition to real tragedies. Perhaps the most notable instance is that of the twin towers, whch are held forever in Everlost "by the memories of a mourning world, and by the dignity of the souls" who died that day. I'm struck by the number of historical events to which Shusterman pays homage. The most prevalent is that of the Hindenhurg, a German passenger airship that infamously exploded on May 6, 1937, while attempting to dock in New Jersey. Another is that of the space shuttle Challenger, about which Shusterman writes, "Ask anyone who was alive at the time, and they will still remember where they were the moment that the shuttle Challenger blew up just thirty-three seconds after lifting off from Cape Canaveral". (Indeed I do. On that dreadful day, I stood in the student union at Judson College, unopened mail forgotten in my hand as I stared aghast at the horrifying television images.) Other tributes are less tragic. The Grand Ole Opry, a weekly country music concert in Nashville that made country music famous, takes center stage in a few chapters. One of the quirks of the Everlost world is that its inhabitants soon start to forget who they are. The first memory to go is of one's name. Most other memories are eventually lost too, which may or may not be so bad except that one becomes whatever memory survives. When Nick wages war against Mary Hightower, his strongest memory is of the chocolate bar which he'd smeared on his face just before the accident, and soon it becomes his dominant memory and thereby endangers his very existence. As it turns out, it's hard to stay alive when one is slowly melting into a pool of chocolate! When another character, Mickey, finds himself sinking into the ground, his anger is what allows him to be successful where others fail. Unfortunately, his anger is what also causes him to develop claws and other monstrous features, until his very nature is corrupted and twisted. While no one can be killed (again) in Everlost, feel pain, or even get injured, one can be tied up, imprisoned, and made to endure other tortures from monsters such as The McGill. -- review submitted by Allison H.-F. - a customer of the Bennett Martin Public Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Customer Review - Everlost

Everlost
by Neil Shusterman [j Shusterman/YA Shusterman]

The front inside flap of Everlost describes it as an imaginative novel that explores questions of life, death, and what might lie in between. As such, and especially because this is a book by Neal Shusterman, who likes to pose grand questions, I read Everlost with the afterlife on my mind. Meet Nick and Allie, whose families' cars crash head-on one fateful day, sending our hero and heroine hurtling down a tunnel towards a light. But instead of reaching that light, Nick and Allie bump into one another and awake in a forest clearing. Soon, Nick and Allie are introduced to the concept of inter-life, or that space between life and death. It isn't purgatory or Nirvana, but is rather a completely new kind of limbo. As the tale continues to unravel, we learn that God hears prayers in Everlost and that there are also evil spirits. While Shusterman doesn't, as I initially expected him to, pose questions about the specifics of heaven or hell or various recognized states of limbo, he does explore the BIG question about what happens after we die. -- review submitted by Allison H.-F. - a customer of the Bennett Martin Public Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Customer Review - The Secret Keeper

The Secret Keeper
by Kate Morton [Morton]

Yes, I have read book reviews before but never written one, or thought that I might. My reading history almost exclusively consists of legal, police, forensic, or medical, mystery/thrillers. It's unclear why I would have suspended "The Secret Keeper" for checkout but an action that I was certain was an error, has turned into my favorite fiction selection in many years. I admit, in the beginning there were doubts about the book. It started in such an unusual format I felt certain it would involve a multitude of characters and their history to keep track of. (Senior aged reader here.) It also appeared as though it would be a slow paced read. This was definitely not the case. After the basic story begins, I found it to hold mystery after mystery, suspense after suspense. The writing is amazing and follows each character so precisely there was certainly no reason to be concerned about tracking from chapter to chapter. If you are a reader that enjoys unpredictable story events as well as endings, then you will love this book. It provides both, while seamlessly relaying an unusual and intriguing story. Forget the cover description. This novel is much more. For now the Deaver, Gardner, Jackson, Turow, and Hoag titles are on hold while I read the other three books in the library by The Secret Keeper author, Kate Morton. -- review submitted by Cheryl H. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Monday, October 21, 2013

Customer Review - Whispers at Moonrise

Whispers at Moonrise
by C.C. Hunter [YA Hunter]

A great finale to the Shadow Falls series! I love how Kylie and Lucas end up together!!! Plus Mario and that creepy John guy have been defeated!!!! I wonder how Kylie's mom will take knowing about the supernatural world!! -- review submitted by Raven H. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Customer Review - Gone

Gone
by Michael Grant [YA Grant]

This the first installment in the Gone series about everyone over 15 disappearing. It all starts with Sam in History class. One moment there's the teacher, then, poof! He's gone. A dome forms around the small California town trapping all the teens and kids inside. There is no TV, internet, or radio.At first everyone starts wasting food, rejoicing there are no adults around. Then people get hurt, there's the possibility they might run out of food, and they need a leader. Sam self-appoints himself, whit his friend Quinn, and a girl from his school, Astrid. Then, there's the academy up the hill. Up there people are already starving.Down in the town riots are breaking out, war is brewing with the academy and Sam and his people, and there is a feel of darkness in the air. Will they get out alive? Read the book to find out! -- review submitted by Ashley A. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Customer Review - Hold Me Closer, Necromancer

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer
by Lish McBride [YA McBride]

This is a great book. My friend gave it to me and I totally love it. You should read this. -- review submitted by Teresa G. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Life on Mars (US version)

Life on Mars (US edition)
[DVD Life]

This 2008-2009 US television series was based on a 2006-2007 two-season British show of the same name. In both shows, Sam Tyler is a modern-day (early 2000s) cop (played by Jason O'Meara in the US version), who is critically injured and wakes up to find himself back in 1973. Still a cop, and newly assigned to a New York City police district, Sam finds himself working with a colorful group of fellow detectives, include a brutal, ball-breaking Lt. Gene Hunt (Harvey Keitel in this American version), a sleazy womanizing detective Ray Carling (Michael Imperioli) and impressionable young detective Chris Skelton (Jonathan Murphy). Also in the department is Officer Annie Norris (Gretchen Mo), a young female officer who wants to join the squad of detectives. Confused and uncertain about what has happened to him, Sam Tyler tries to do his job as a cop, using technologies and procedures that are 30 years of out date -- the cops occasionally brutalize their suspects, and instant communication by cellphone is a pipe dream. When not working, and trying to be a "decent" cop in a squad that doesn't follow the rules, Sam also tries to figure how what has happened to him and if there's a way for him to get back to 2008 and the life he left behind. This US version featured a terrific cast, and primo production values. I grew up watching 1970s cop shows, and this harkens back to that era very well. The science-fictional elements of how Sam got stuck backwards in time are creative, and there are little hints that build up to the eventual conclusion throughout the course of the entire season, if you pay close attention. Personally, I think the British version was better done, and a little bit more edgy -- the two series also had completely different finales. But, if you're looking for a creative cop show with an interesting twist, I'd recommend the US version of Life on Mars. This DVD also has several "special features", including bloopers, deleted scenes. a production design on how they recreated the world of 1973, a "day in the life of Jason O'Meara on set', and a visit to the Life on Mars set by Lee Majors, who would have been starring on The $6 Million Man at the same time this series was set -- he offers insights as to how accurate this series' producers were on recreating that era. -- recommended by Scott C. - Bennett Martin Public Library

[Also available, although not in the Lincoln City Libraries collection – the original British version of the series (2006-2007) – you can request this through our InterLibrary Loan service!]

[ Internet Movie Database entry for this series ] | [ Life on Mars (US) at epguides.com ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Friday, October 18, 2013

Customer Review - The Secret Life of Bees

The Secret Life of Bees
by Sue Monk Kidd [Kidd]

The Secret Life of Bees is a moving book. It is very descriptive and heartfelt, and a big tear jerker. It is set in the 50s and is about a girl named Lily who runs away with her African-American maid/step in mother, who is about to be killed, and finds a place where she truly belongs and gets to know more than she could hope for about her departed mother. They go to Tiburon SC, and stumble upon a house of 3 African-American sisters. They learn the ways of life and beekeeping. Lily gets love from them which she never got from her father, T. Ray. August, one of the sisters recognizes Lily the moment she enters the house and knows she is lying about who she is, but waits till Lily is ready to tell her the truth. This book covers all sorts of topics from religion, violence, and what it means to have a true family. I highly reccomend it if you like books that have very strong female leads. -- review submitted by Lilly G. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Stranger Here

Stranger Here: How Weight Loss Surgery Transformed my Body and Messed with My Head
by Jen Larsen [Biography Larsen]

Join Jen on one of the biggest decisions of her life – obtaining weight loss surgery – and watch the surprising impact it has on friends, loved ones, and even strangers. Weight loss alone does not seem to be as easy and a permanent fix as she sets up for. Become absorbed as she has to face an even bigger issue – herself. -- recommended by Sarah J. - South Branch Library

[ official Stranger Here page on the official Jen Larsen web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Customer Review - Beneath the Glitter

Beneath the Glitter
by Elle and Blaire Fowler [YA Fowler]

This book is really good for any fashionista romance loving teen. It was so cool reading them after watching them on Youtube for so long. The name itself just sounds so girly! If you are a girly girl make this book the next on your list. This book is written so well. It made me feel like I was wathing it all happen. They did a terrific job. It is about two sisters who because famous on Youtube and they have a chance to have there own makeup line. The book is about their romanctic and sisterly struggles. -- review submitted by Jetta T. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

The Husband

The Husband
by Dean Koontz

"We have your wife. You can get her back for $2M cash. You've got until midnight Wednesday." "This is nuts. I'm a gardener. I've got maybe $11K in the bank." "Just so you know we're serious...see that guy across the street?" Still holding the phone to his ear, Mitch turned away, saw a man walking a dog...Rifle fire shattered the stillness, and the dogwalker went down, shot in the head." So begins a good ol' suspense story, not the standard supernatural tale one has come to expect from Dean Koontz. This is more like a Hitchcock story of an everyman caught up in an unbelievable and terrifying event. Aside from Mitch trying to come up with the funds to rescue his beloved wife, he's also trying to figure out why they were targeted. Halfway through the book we learn the stunning whys, and follow Mitch as he takes control of their destinies, including evading the police and a frantic car chase that has you on the edge of your seat. -- recommended by Charlotte K. - Bennett Martin Public Library

[Also available in book-on-cd and Large Print formats.]

[ official The Husband page on the official Dean Koontz web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Customer Review - A Long Way From You

A Long Way From You
by Gwendolyn Heasley [YA Heasley]

Right now, I am totally loving this book and although I'm only halfway through, it's still really entertaning. I am kind of weird cause I didn't read the first in the series yet, but I am looking forward to reading it as soon as I'm done with this one. -- review submitted by Teresa G. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

The Compound

The Compound
by S.A. Bodeen [YA Bodeen]

The Compound by S.A. Bodeen is a nice dose of originality in the often cluttered genre of YA fiction. Eli has been in the compound for six years and in that time has learned to hate it, and himself. When they entered the compound, believing there was a nuclear war, Eli was separated from his twin brother, Eddy. After years in the compound Eli hates himself for Eddy being left outside and believes that Eddy, along with the rest of the world, were destroyed. Eli and his sisters cope with their entrapment in different ways, none all that healthy. Food is running low in the compound as well, and Eli and his mother and sisters can't bear to even consider the other option. The Supplements. Eli refuses to even acknowledge that part father's plan. Then Eli discovers that not all his father told him is true, that his brother may in fact still be alive. And he will do anything to escape. The story moves very quickly and is fast paced. I never really bored while reading, though I thought the writing was a bit simplistic. The story itself was quite clever and I felt the ending was satisfying though expected. I did have a very strong dislike for Eli however, and that made him a very hard main character to relate to. With strong concepts and an interesting setting, reluctant readers will definitely enjoy this book. -- recommended by Wyatt P. - Gere Branch Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try the sequel to The Compound, The Fallout.]

[Also available in book-on-cd and Playaway formats.]

[ official S.A. Bodeen Blog on LiveJournal ] | [ official website for Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen a.k.a. S.A. Bodeen ]
 

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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Customer Review - Chomp

Chomp
by Carl Hiaasen [YA Hiassen]

This book was a book that took me awhile to get into. I had to admit, the beginning was a bit boring, but as you kept going into the book, it began to get more interesting. It's about a boy and his father, Mickey (father) and Wahoo (son) are hired to be on a show called "Expedition: Survival!" starring Derek Badger. The title of the book really relects on the book, because Derek has been "chomped" so many times by many animals, because he has no experience or skills with animals, even though in the whole plot of the show, he's supposed to be an animal expert. -- review submitted by Amilia B. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Monday, October 14, 2013

Customer Review - The Princess Diaries

The Princess Diaries
by Meg Cabot [YA Cabot]

This book is very different from the movie. I like it a lot better. It is very funny and is the first book in a great series. This book features Mia Thermopolis, a nerdy highschool girl who wants to fit in. She has a genius bestfriend,Lily Moscovits who doesnt care what people think. In this book Mia figures out a secret that will change her life when her grandmother come to her apartment in New York. Mia's grandmother tells her she is the queen of Genovia, her father is a prince, and she is next in line for the throne. In a flash her life changes. The popular crowd now adores her, her friends treat her differently, and she struggles to figure out her identity. She befriends a shy, rich girl named Tina and figures out she is just as normal and nice as her friend Lily. Mia doesnt want to be a princess though and has a hard time adjusting. If you love teen books that are funny and full of drama this series will be a great one for you to read. -- review submitted by Lilly G. - customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Mystery Science Theater 3000 - 20th Anniversary Edition DVD

Mystery Science Theater 3000 – 20th Anniversary Edition
[DVD Mystery]

For 11 years, starting on a Minneapolis-based UHF station, then moving to The Comedy Channel (before it became Comedy Central), and then finishing its run on the Sci Fi Channel, Mystery Science Theater 3000 was a brilliant, sarcastic, laugh-until-you-cry poke in the eye towards bad moviemaking. The set up of this low-budget show was that a couple of mad geniuses send a goofball maintenance worker to an orbiting satellite (The Satellite of Love), where they conduct psychological experiments on him by forcing him to watch really, really bad movies. He responds by cannibalizing some of the satellite's equipment to create several robot sidekicks (each with a different personality), who watch the movies with him. Joel Hodgson was the first host, alongside robots Tom Servo and Crow T. Robot, and Joel was later replaced with Mike Nelson. Each weekly episode featured comic bits with Joel/Mike and the 'Bots, followed by an airing of a cheesy old movie -- originally a mix of scifi, horror, or any other kind of bad 1950s and 1960s movies, but with the move to the Sci Fi Channel, the fare became exclusively science fiction or fantasy. Occasionally, if the feature film was too short, they'd also sit through and make fun of "shorts" (industrial training clips, short documentaries, safety films, etc.). As the movie aired, Joel/Mike and the 'Bots appeared as silhouettes sitting in movie theater seats at the bottom of the screen, and throughout the movie, they made mocking jokes about the dialog, lighting, plot, etc. The writers on this show were absolutely brilliant -- the jokes made about the movies ranged from the blatantly obvious to obscure Shakespearean references or quips about economics theory. But it never seemed high-brow   it was always accessible to the average audience. Joel and Mike, as "hosts", had quite different personalities -- Joel's humor was dry, soft-spoken and kind of spacy. Mike was more of a lovable, slightly dim-witted goofball. Over the years, the MST3K gang have released a large variety of their nearly-200 episodes, usually in packs of 2 to 3 "movies" per DVD set. This particular set, released to celebrate the series' 20th anniversary in 2008, contains four really strong entries, particularly Laserblast and Werewolf. You'll have to go hunting for the absolute best of MST3K though. My personal favorite is Manos the Hands of Fate -- one of the worst films ever made, and gloriously skewered by the MST3K crew. As this 20th anniversary set is the only set in the libraries' collection at present, I recommend it as a great introduction to the format. -- recommended by Scott C. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try the book Mike Nelson's Movie Megacheese.]

[ Internet Movie Database entry for this series ] | [ official Mystery Science Theater 3000 web site ] | [ Satellite News: The Official MST3K Fan Site ] | [ MST3K episode guide at epguides.com ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Customer Review - The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games
by Suzanne Collins [YA Collins]

This book is amazing. What interested me in this book was that it seems like all ages are getting interested in it. She wrote it so well that I can imagine this happening in a hundred years or so. Even through all the violence she still manages to throw some romance. Which I'm sure every teenage girl loves. Katniss Everdeen is just a normal teenage girl dealing with boy problems, except she has to deal with something a normal teenage girl doesn't she had to choose between her sister fighting to the death or herself. She chooses to make herself fight to the death in the terrible arena. Also known as the Hunger Games. Set up by the Capital to make sure another war never happens. Katniss and Peeta Mellark are the ones from District 12 who have to fight int he arena. The rest you'll have to find out by reading it yourself! -- review submitted by Jetta T. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

The Ludwig Conspiracy

The Ludwig Conspiracy
by Oliver Pötzsch

Munich antique bookseller Steven Lukas is enjoying his quiet life until people began to show up, asking questions about a diary he does not know he possess. A woman, Sara, asks if he has seen her uncle, Steven does recall the elderly man who talked over a book of poems and then vanished from the shop. Steven then accidently finds an odd box on one of his shelves he knows he did not purchase. Inside is the historic diary of Doctor Theodore Marot, which accounts the last days of the fairy tale king Ludwig's life. One evening a group of mysterious thugs try to break in and take the diary, Sara saves Steven and they are both quickly thrust into an adventure that will take them across Germany in an effort to solve the century old mystery surrounding Ludwig's death. The Ludwig Conspiracy, by German author Oliver Pötzsch, is a very intriguing novel with the mysterious King Ludwig II playing an integral part. Before reading about this book I had never heard of the fairy tale king Ludwig and was immediately drawn to the historic aspect of the mystery. Pötzsch comes off very well researched in his accounts of the King and in the brief glimpses into the past with Theodore as the narrator are both thrilling and lush with historical accounts. The present day setting with Steven and Sara however does leave a little to be desired. I found the plot to be much what you would expect of the genre and many of the plot twists which should have come as a surprise were both expected and a bit cliched. Pötzsch is a very good writer however predictable I may have found the plot to be, and I will most definitely be checking out his Hangman's Daughter series. -- recommended by Wyatt P. - Gere Branch Library

[ publisher's official Ludwig Conspiracy web page ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Customer Review - Chain Reaction

Chain Reaction
by Simone Elkles [YA Elkles]

It was a great end to the series. It is amazing, and i loved it and if you haven't read the first two, go read them. They are Perfect Chemistry and Rules of Attraction. I loved them all, and hope you do too. This one is really really good in the first twelve chapters, so read away. -- review submitted by Teresa G. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Dan Gets a Minivan

Dan Gets a Minivan: A Life at the Intersection of Dude and Dad
by Dan Zevin [Biography Zevin]

Humorous anecdotes on parenting and marital relationships, as Dan tries to make the transition from couplehood to familyhood. Grabbed me by the second paragraph. Some stories were so hilarious I was laughing out loud – everyone at the fast food restaurant where I was reading was staring at me. Covers topics all parents can identify with: buying that first minivan, finding a reliable babysitter, as well as Dan trying to recover from knee surgery, and shopping with his dad at Costco. -- recommended by Charlotte K. - Bennett Martin Public Library
[ official Dan Gets a Minivan page on the official Dan Zevin web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Friday, October 11, 2013

Customer Review - Smart Girls Get What They Want

Smart Girls Get What They Want
by Sarah Strohmeyer [YA]

This book does a good job of showing that you can change yourself for the better, no matter how deep you are into your current persona. The main character, Gigi, is a relatable girl that is instantly likable and someone you can root for. This book is somewhat unique in the plot but it isn't hard to understand. This was a really good book!. -- review submitted by Taylor J. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter (on DVD)

Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter
[DVD Abraham]

After his mother is killed by a vampire Abraham Lincoln makes it his mission in life to find that vampire and kill him. Along the way he meets Henry Sturgess who teaches him how to fight vampires and directs him to those in the area. He works in a store during the day and kills them at night. While working at the store he meets Mary Todd. Soon he learns that the vampires are fighting with the confederate army. Benjamin Walker plays ax-wielding Lincoln. It's an interesting twist to history. -- recommended by Carrie K. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter by Seth Graham-Smith, the book the movie is based on, or any other Lincoln movie.]

[Also available in downloadable audio, downloadable e-book, traditional print, book-on-cd and Traditional Print formats.]

[ Internet Movie Database entry for this film ] | [ official Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter Facebook page ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Customer Review - The Rules of Attraction

The Rules of Attraction
by Simone Elkles [YA Elkles]

It was amazing, the way she has you going back and fourth all the time. I loved it! -- review submitted by Teresa G. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Murder on the Orient Express (on CD)

Murder on the Orient Express
by Agatha Christie [Compact Disc Christie]

Detective Hercule Poirot is traveling aboard the Orient Express; his car is full of a wide variety of people. One night the the train comes to a stop due to the tracks being blocked with snow. That night one of the passengers is murdered. The following day Poirot investigates to find that the murdered man is in fact guilty of kidnapping in the United States. Poirot then begins to assemble clues as to who and why. Most of the book consists of interviewing the passengers, searching the train carriage, and Poirot talking the details over with his friend – owner of the train company. I listened to the audio book version of this novel and the narrator did a nice job putting on accents and different voices for the cast of characters. After finishing it I feel I could read it over again knowing how it turns out and looking for clues I missed the first time around. I'd recommend this those who enjoy cozy mysteries or intricate plots. -- recommended by Kristen A. - Gere Branch Library [Aside from her other novels, readers who enjoy her work may also like: Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making; More Stories and Secrets From her Notebooks (downloadable ebook via Overdrive) and The Grand Tour by Agatha Christie and Mathew Prichard.]

[Also available in a wide variety of other formats.]

[ official Agatha Christie web site ] 


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Customer Review - Dragonswood

Dragonswood
by Janet Lee Carey [YA Carey]

Set on the same island in a time and place of dragons and fairies, Dragonswood is a companion book to the award winning novel, Dragon's Keep. Dragonswood takes place years after Princess Rosalind, the main character of Dragon's Keep, had her adventures, following the struggles of a seventeen-year-old girl named Tess. She and her friends are forced to flee from a ruthless witch hunter and a village that accuses her of all kinds of evil witchcraft. But even as she faces the hardships of her journey, she falls for a mysterious man who helps he and her friends, as well as learning more about her past than she had ever imagined. If you read Dragon's Keep, even if you didn't like it, I suggest you read this book. While the story and writing are similar, Dragonswood is more interesting and faster paced, making it an ideal novel for any teen or adult that enjoys fantasy. -- review submitted by Sammy B. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

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New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Parental Guidance

Parental Guidance
[DVD Parental]

This is a really great family film – I enjoyed it from beginning to end! Billy Crystal and Bette Midler are grandparents who get stuck babysitting their grandchildren of Type-A, high-strung, over-protective parents (Marisa Tomei). Hilarity ensues when a technological house and the grand-kids take over. It is up to the grandparents to keep the children safe and sound until the parents get back from their trip. One of my favorite scenes was the duet of "The Book of Love" between Midler and Crystal. All around a great comical family movie, and a positive overall message at the end about bringing families together. (Watch after the credits for funny outtakes, too – it looks like they had a blast making the movie!). -- recommended by Jeremiah J. - Bennett Martin Public Library

[ Internet Movie Database entry for this film ] | [ official Parental Guidance web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Customer Review - Deadly Little Secret

Deadly Little Secret
by Laurie Stolarz [YA Stolarz]

This is an amazing book! I love how the author keeps you on your toes about who "Jack" really is.... a must read! -- review submitted by Raven H. - a customer of the Gere Branch Library

Have you read this one? What did you think? Did you find this review helpful?

New Customer Reviews appear regularly in the pages of the BookGuide web site, particularly during the Summer Reading Program. You can visit the Customer Reviews page to see them all and/or submit your own, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually as we receive them.

Libriomancer

Libriomancer
by Jim C. Hines

Fantasy author Jim C. Hines has slowly been building a reputation for himself as the master of humorous fantasy – territory dominated by the likes of Terry Pratchett, Robert Asprin and Christopher Stasheff. Despite meeting Hines myself two years ago, when he was Author Guest of Honor at the second ConStellation NE scifi convention here in Lincoln back in 2011, I had not yet read any of Hines' novels or short stories, when I recently saw Libriomancer on display at a bookstore. The concept of a magic-using librarian caught my attention, of course, considering my career path, and I quickly devoured this first book in Hines' new series. As a long-time fan of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files series, I have to say that Libriomancer feels a little like Butcher-lite, but that's actually a compliment, considering how much I love that more-established series. The writing is strong, the characters, particularly Isaac Vainio (the protagonist) are well-realized and likeable. And, most important, Hines has created a magic-using system for his world that is intriguing and fresh – quite an accomplishment considering the glut of contemporary urban fantasy novels currently on the market. In Libriomancer's universe, certain individuals have the ability to physically reach into the content of published books and pull forth the items described therein for use in our world, before returning the items to the books' pages – items such as Arthur's sword Excaliber from Le Morte d'Arthur, or a laser blaster from a pulp scifi novel, or a miracle plague cure from a medical thriller. In other words, as all lovers of literature already know...books are magical, and true lovers of books have the ability to tap into that magic. The physical sizes of the books limit the physical sizes of the retrieved objects, and certain books are "locked" to prevent objects of great or deadly power from being manipulated in the "real world" – no Sauron's Ring in the hands of somebody in Middle America, if you please! In this volume, in addition to establishing the world Vainio lives in – filled with vampires, golems and power-mad magicians, Hines sets in motion a far-reaching and deadly plot for Isaac to confront. The pleasures of this book are in the fresh take on magic, and the witty banter between the characters, though I found some of the action sequences a bit muddled. I recommend it for fans of Butcher, Rachel Caine or Patricia Briggs. -- recommended by Scott C. - Bennett Martin Public Library [If you enjoy this, you may also wish to try Codex Born, the second volume in the series, which just came out in September 2013.]

[ official Jim C. Hines web site ]


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New reviews appear every month on the Staff Recommendations page of the BookGuide website. You can visit that page to see them all, or watch them appear here in the BookGuide blog individually over the course of the entire month. Click the tag for the reviewer's name to see more of this reviewers recommendations!